The casinos are intent on keeping players interested in their games. They use those little old tricks of the trade and they are good at it too. One of them is to keep the player thinking a big win is Oh! So close. If you ever played the slots you'll know exactly what I mean, it drives you to drink.

This practice of showing combinations that is similar to winning combinations more frequently than would occur randomly is called near-miss programming. It has been ruled illegal in the states of Nevada and New Jersey. Other states have adapted the same rule for "near misses" that New Jersey and Nevada have.

The machine cannot be specially programmed to show winning combinations more frequently than other combinations above or below the pay line.

The mellow dramatic methods that the reels take in slowing down getting your heart pumping, hands sweating for the brief moment we all fantasize about the jackpot, but then in a split second reality set in you are just another "LOSER". We have all been there and thought the same thing.

Let's face it; unless you're playing Video Poker, there is no strategy to winning at slots. I know your saying what about all the systems that are advertised to teach you how to beat or win at the slots. They are all useless gimmicks, the only way you're going to beat the slots today, tomorrow, or the next day is to be in the Right Place at the Right Time.

I don't recommend you play slots with the intent of getting rich off of a lucky pull one day. Rather, I would recommend that if you must play that you play strictly for amusement. If you play on a consistent basis you can realize that the small wins that come every once in a while do nothing to add to you winnings, but rather they will help deplete it on a consistent basis.

If you have a Players card (and there is no reason why you should not have one). Ask a casino host, how much play is needed for a buffet, show tickets, a free room or other comps the casino is offering. It's your money that paying for the comps anyway.

Comps and the play needed to earn them can vary by casino. Rule of thumb, but not etched in stone, is that generally the big glamorous casino require considerable more action (play) then the smaller older casinos. If you ever been to Vegas you know the casino down town pay far better then the upscale casino on the strip.

Finding the best slot machines is often quite a task. There are many myths propagating around placement within casinos of tight and loose slots. Those are just myths.

If you want to find machines that have higher payout percentages then look for banks of machines that are advertising specific percentages just for that bank.

Remember, you are at the casino to have fun, slot play should be fun. If you lose interest or get bored, cash out, there is always another day. The casinos and the slot machine will be there waiting for you believe me. No sense in rushing back.

The lobbying efforts to get Online Poker legalized in the country are only getting stronger. Poker lobbyists are backed by the multi-million dollar offshore gambling companies which are based in Antigua, Malta and other foreign sanctuaries. The lobbying efforts have been successful to some extent with the Obama administration agreeing to delay the implementation of the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (UIGEA) til June 2010. This has given some reprieve to online gaming operators who argue that if gaming is regularized in the United States it could generate billions of dollars of tax for the Administration. However not all are convinced. Opponents argue that online gambling would increase crime rate, threaten children and increase the overall percentage of Americans addicted to gambling. Some of the major opponents are National Football League, Focus on the Family and Republican Senators like Jon Kyl from Arizona.
The primary support for legalizing online gambling are from Rep. Barney Frank (Mass.) and other Democrats who are leaving no stone unturned to legalize online gambling in the United States. Till this time online gaming lobbyists have spent more than $4 million in lobbying efforts to convince lawmakers that prohibition of online gaming is not a great idea. Other supporters include former Republican senator Alfonse M. D’Amato (N.Y.), chairman of the Poker Players Alliance who is the Chairman of the Poker Players Alliance. The Poker Players Alliance has 1.2 million members and funded by the Interactive Gaming Council, a Canada-based trade group for offshore gambling firms. John Papas, Executive Director of the Poker Players Alliance feels that prohibition is not going to succeed in any of the objectives for which it is intended. Another strong supporter of online gambling is Richard A. Gephardt whose firm is lobbying for PokerStars, a large poker gambling firm based in the Isle of Man.
The opposition to online gaming is also very vociferous and strong. It includes the four major US sports leagues, religious groups and some casinos. Their argument states that online gambling and poker will take gambling right into the living rooms of Americans which is a dangerous proposition. It is fair as long as gambling is confined to ‘brick and mortar’ casinos or a lottery store. In US online gambling is illegal under a 1961 law which was focused on bookies using telephone lines for taking bets. The UIGEA is aimed to iron out any ambiguities that are present with Internet gambling. The new law will prevent banks from accepting credit card payments, checks or any other form of electronic payment related to online gambling. However, the hard lobbying by Poker Alliance and even the financial institutions has put it on hold til June ’10. Though the Obama administration is officially neutral on the issue, it needs to be seen which direction the boat sails after June.